The Fundamental Principle of Lawyer Marketing – Part 1

Lawyers hear so much hype about marketing. What’s the latest and greatest way to attract clients? Is it the new flavor of the day: social networking? Or should you start a  law blog,  join another organization or maybe even advertise? A lot is  involved in marketing to attract legal clients and there can be many moving pieces. But one fundamental principle should be the basis for all lawyer marketing:

“People do business with people they know and they like.”

Too simple? Not really, think about it. Who do you do business with? People you know and you like, right?

Therefore, as applied to lawyers, the principle is: “Prospects hire lawyers they know and they like.” It’s universal and it’s human nature. If you want to attract legal clients, first they have to know you (not just who you are) and they have to like you. Let’s talk about the first part this in this blog post: “Prospects hire lawyers they know.”

Do your prospective clients, your prospects, know you? I mean really know you? Not just as that lawyer who handed out his card at the Chamber of Commerce mixer.” Let’s see, what was his name and what did he say he did?  I don’t remember.” For prospects to really know you they must have more than a cursory contact with you.

A well known marketing principle is that prospects must have multiple contacts with a product before they are ready to buy. The same holds true for legal services. Handing out your card to someone without following up is virtually worthless. If you are at a networking event and would like to make some marketing hay, don’t try to see how many cards you can had out. Concentrate on making a deeper contact with fewer people. Then follow up with those contacts repeatedly.

How much follow up? Some sources say seven times. I believe that you should have three follow ups at a minimum.

Over what period of time? The first follow up should be soon after the initial contact; within a few days or a week. Then, depending on the relationship you have developed with the prospect (see part 2), you should schedule regular follow ups over a relatively short period of time. You need to stay within your integrity but, at the same time, be a bit assertive in following up. It is necessary to be organized about your follow up. Put follow up dates on your calendar or to-do list.

How do I follow up? There are numerous methods for following up depending on what was said during the initial contact (see part 2). Regardless of the method used in your follow ups your focus should be:

  1. What do I have in common with this person? or
  2. How can I help this person (not just as an attorney)?

Have a Great Practice!

Daniel Roberts

Professional Lawyer Coach

www.coachingforlawyers.com

 

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